Tag Archives: Gary Oldman

The Woman in the Window Review

Wanting to coast along on its Alfred Hitchcock influence, The Woman in the Window does little to separate itself from Rear Window. That is fertile ground to harvest from, and if done right then there is certainly room for characters within this Joe Wright-directed piece to flourish and grow. Here is the shut-in neighbour, nosey not out of interest for others but out of boredom. She uncovers a potential murder and must work from home (like all of us have done for the past year) to solve a potential case of crime. You may know these narrative beats inside out, but it is what The Woman in the Window does with them that brings out the most interest of all. Not much is the answer, but bless them for trying.  

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Dracula Review

Countless adaptations, reworkings and allusions to the Bram Stoker classic have been offered to audiences through a variety of mediums. There are only so many that can stick out and ingrain themselves in the legacy of Count Dracula. Who better to helm such a project than Francis Ford Coppola? Knowing that the best way to open any adaptation is with the sultry, smooth Welsh tones of Anthony Hopkins, Coppola’s rendition of Dracula adapts the Stoker classic with a finesse audiences should have expected. Here is a director whose finest works are based on the written word, whose first Academy Award came from adapting life into art, and who, when pressed for a rich experience, has no trouble delivering.

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The Dark Knight Review

To cobble together thoughts on The Dark Knight over a decade after its release is to look more at its legacy and impact on filmmaking than on any specific part. Many an amicable discussion may come from the longevity of such a piece, whether on the topic of Christopher Nolan’s stunning direction or the blurring of action, thriller and detective genres. Those are effective, but The Dark Knight can work best as an understanding of comic book villains. It sets the bar high for those that wish to replicate these heroes and horror stories for later iterations. It holds a legacy that is known by many, mainly the tragic brilliance of Heath Ledger. But to look beyond that for a moment, there are performances here that outshine the craft he presents, moments that provide subtlety, unnoticed in the face of the best-remembered scenes and quotable moments.  

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Batman Begins Review

Origin stories are no stranger to the world of superhero adaptations. Comic book capers can nary exit the opening minutes of their narrative without murdering a plot device here or strapping a protagonist with a bit of devastating backstory there. At the end of it all, few are as frequently told as that of Batman. Batman Begins is no stranger to the story of Bruce Wayne, his aversion to winged beasts and living parents wheeled out in every iteration the big screen could possibly throw at audiences. As audiences, we find comfort in similar entertainment, and that, to some degree, is the appeal of superheroes. We are told the same story consistently, with a handful of variables found in-between. It is Christopher Nolan’s work with Batman Begins that massages both entertainment value and storytelling prominence, to varying degrees of success.

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