Tag Archives: Bruce Greenwood

Star Trek Into Darkness Review

An already established universe behind it, Star Trek Into Darkness should have an easy run of worldbuilding exercises that can help further expand this J.J. Abrams science-fiction vision. No such luck. Meandering along without much to prove and even less to show for itself, Star Trek Into Darkness is an uncomfortably predictable piece with quite a strange change in pace and tone. Bumping out some of the more established characters and gambling on the introduction of Benedict Cumberbatch as a nostalgia-pop villain, surrounded by the fairly well-established new heroes adorned in roles of a bleak and whimsical past. There is room to grow into them for these characters, and thankfully, Star Trek Into Darkness does offer that in spotty moments of discourse.

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Star Trek Review

Even with those thick, glossy atmosphere choices, the work of J.J. Abrams on Star Trek is far better than first expected. Having no love for the series that spawned it all certainly helps when engaging with what is, essentially, a remastering of the characters and varied stories at the heart of this installation. A reference here or there will go over the heads of newly approached novices to the Star Trek universe, but as long as the bulk of it is understandable, the threats obvious and the chemistry between the ensemble successful, then Star Trek will have no trouble appealing to a new generation. A desire to engage with that is quite difficult, but easily optimised by smart writing that rattles through the quick and successful portions of the Gene Roddenberry show.

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I’m Not There Review

Adapting the life and talent of Bob Dylan to the biopic genre was an inevitability. It is hard to see how anyone could stop it from happening. For all the failed markups of The Beatles, The Beach Boys and the big names around the 1960s, pulling off a dissection of The Voice of a Generation is no small feat. I’m Not There plays with the format of traditional detailing. Dylan defines a meaning or passage of time for so many people, spread across generations. To adapt that correctly, no one man can portray Dylan, and that is what director Todd Haynes gets right with I’m Not There. As Stuck Inside of Mobile with the Memphis Blues Again plays through the opening credits and the passages of time cross the screen, I’m Not There springs to life.

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Kodachrome Review

In death, there is salvation for the estranged fathers and miserable sons who try and follow in their faded footsteps. Kodachrome utilises this process well, with its difficult relationship between a father and son slowly mended in the final days of the father’s life. Ed Harris and Jason Sudeikis’ pairing on-screen from director Mark Raso finds the pair playing characters who, for one reason or another, are at the end of their respective roads. One is, quite literally at the end of his, taking the final days of his life as best he can. The other has nearly been dropped by the job that held him for a decade, his ears no longer helping his music career. What a pairing for a road trip. 

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Gold Review

Tragic it may be that the titular Spandau Ballet song is absent from this Matthew McConaughey feature, Gold has bigger problems on its mind than musical omissions. Its story of a modern-day prospector should offer up daring adventure and dramatic, cutthroat business dealings. Instead, it can only hope to copy those that came before it. We cannot expect everyone to be original, but when you fall toward captivating and controlling the themes of American Hustle, you find yourself in dangerous waters indeed. That is where Gold finds itself, and it can do nothing to haul itself out of that dangerous zone. 

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Flight Review

I’ve always thought it odd that Robert Zemeckis, a man who crafted such classics of the 80s and early 90s, could spiral so rapidly into films that were lifeless hack jobs, failing to capture anything close to the magic he could put to screen in his glory days. Perhaps he became a parody of himself somewhere along the way, for all his Oscar success with Tom Hanks, he soon found himself recycling the same style and formula in the hopes of bagging more favour with those in high places with the Academy Awards. Flight feels like his strongest effort at nudging himself back into the public eye, with Denzel Washington taking centre stage, but this pairing fails to take flight.  

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Exotica Review

From the first moments of the methodical, slow piano chords, the panning camera moving across a painted wall of faux nature, I could tell Exotica would be a treat. A film shrouded in relative obscurity, unacceptable it may be that this hasn’t received a wider audience, this film somewhat forgotten by the mainstream is a desirable masterclass in story-oriented tension. Perhaps the seedy atmospheres and infrequency of solid supporting characters would turn away the more Hollywood-oriented heyday of movie-goer, but Exotica has within it such hidden brilliance, a stylish drama with all the usual connectors, but with such unexpected leaps and amazing performances, the largest components working with the smallest, most critical and crucial of details.

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Truth Review

Whilst most of my interest in watching Truth is based off of Robert Redford’s inclusion, I do think my studying of journalism at University has added a bit more interest in the project. More so than I would have first expected, especially since in recent years, Truth hasn’t exactly become the modern-day All the President’s Men. Based on the true story of CBS’ 60 Minutes broadcast in which anchorman Dan Rather brings allegations of sitting President George W. Bush’s military service into question. Doubt settled in, controversy began to spark, and those at the centre of the reporting found themselves backpedalling, with desperation taking control. Truth looks to adapt that, with the blessing of Rather himself, in the debut feature of James Vanderbilt. 

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