Tag Archives: Dracula

Dracula Review

Countless adaptations, reworkings and allusions to the Bram Stoker classic have been offered to audiences through a variety of mediums. There are only so many that can stick out and ingrain themselves in the legacy of Count Dracula. Who better to helm such a project than Francis Ford Coppola? Knowing that the best way to open any adaptation is with the sultry, smooth Welsh tones of Anthony Hopkins, Coppola’s rendition of Dracula adapts the Stoker classic with a finesse audiences should have expected. Here is a director whose finest works are based on the written word, whose first Academy Award came from adapting life into art, and who, when pressed for a rich experience, has no trouble delivering.

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Dracula By Bram Stoker Review

A catalyst for gothic horror and the many spin-offs of such a tenacious genre, Bram Stoker’s Dracula is a founding father of decrepit castles, cobweb-infused coffins and kindles the fears of hearing a bump in the night. Told through diary entries, memorandums, letters and news clippings, Dracula details a chronological order which hopes to bring frights and terrors to the forefront of its story, which details the titular Count and his meddlesome passage to England. There, he is met with clear opposition, and this cast of heroic protagonists stop at nothing to send him back to where he came from. The grave, not Transylvania.

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Dracula Review

A slow crawl towards the tomb of the deceased vampire and the spritz of blood that soon follows gives audiences the terror and horror only Dracula could bring. Another entry into the Hammer Horror era of classic filmmaking, director Terence Fisher offers the chance to experience the work of a collation of brilliant British actors at the height of their powers. The top form presented is a clear sign, indicating the real strength of the industry and their talents of adaptation for books of old. Here is no surprise, Dracula is everything the genre at the time offered to those wanting chills and thrills, all set to a timely backdrop of grand castles, worthy parents and one doctor striving to figure out the aims of a villainous beast residing in the halls of a grandiose manor.  

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Dracula: Dead and Loving It Review

The age-old history of Dracula as a cultural piece is something that dominated the early years of cinema. Since then, adaptations and reworkings have been frequent, to varying degrees of success. Whilst Francis Ford Coppola struck better success with his adaptation of Dracula, the attempts made by Mel Brooks and Leslie Nielsen fared a tad worse. Pairing two legendary comedic actors together should have provided some great laughs, memorable moments and a great final outing for Brooks behind the camera, but it’s a complete disaster from start to finish. Dracula: Dead and Loving It showcases its finest joke in the title, really, the writing doesn’t improve from there.

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