Tag Archives: Irvine Welsh

Crime Review

If the drab affair of Creation Stories taught audiences and author Irvine Welsh one thing, it is that dab hands in novels are not the same for scriptwriting. That Ewen Bremner-led piece was as sordid as Welsh’s work gets, but not put together correctly. It lacked the pace of the written prose and the subsequent adaptations that come from it. Apparently, Britbox did not hear of the car crash scriptwriting attempt Welsh was involved in and brought him on to adapt a piece of his later bibliography, Crime. A straight-shooting and soulful sequel to Filth, a book and film that relied on the wackier imagery, the wilder content found within and the distance it placed between regular police work and its protagonist.

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Filth Review

Degeneracy has never looked as sorrowful as James McAvoy, screaming, crying and berating his way through a comfortably unnerving hour and a half, adapting the words of Irvine Welsh with director Jon S. Baird. Filth is just that. Utter smut. It is vile and depraved in ways only Welsh could conjure. Trainspotting might be a delve into the heroin scene, but it is the acceptance of decadence there that makes it less shocking. When the long arm of the law is dabbling in the crimes that they are meant to crack down on, all under the guise of catchy and obnoxious taglines, the same rules mentality and the care-free attitude of a proud Scotsman hating his fellow man, it becomes a melting point of vagrancy and a sincere turn of how forgiving an audience can be.

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Ewan Gleadow’s 20 Books to Read in Your 20s

Twitter makes the rounds once again with a good idea rightfully mocked by people posting gags and wind-ups almost immediately.

20 books for your 20s. Controversially, as a 22-year-old and part of the target audience for these many varied and often dullard social media posts, there are only so many books that can truly be helpful. The collected works of Jeff Kinney’s Diary of the Wimpy Kid series, while hilarious, is not helpful.

But books are helpful to those that wish to seek help from them. Knowledge is porridge. Only to those that wish to read are they helpful, and only those that want to read a certain topic or writer will benefit.

There is no universal setlist of 20 books to choose from, deliberate over or study. Important books, yes, but books are personable experiences, so it would be futile to pick out 20 books and recommend them to everyone.

What that opens, though, is the possibility to reminisce and explain the 20 books that shaped the early years of decade number three (or four, as my birthday rests on the dying days of 1999). Unfortunately, that does mean putting up with personal encounters, first-person writing and gushing recommendations of books that will not affect you as they did me.

10 books of fiction, and another 10 of non-fiction, for good measure and balance.

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