Tag Archives: Eric Bana

Chopper Review

Before Bronson came Chopper. Notorious criminals and the fame they garner for themselves as being beyond the level of usually hardened cell fodder is a fascinating avenue that has grown commercial through true crime and true fascination. No wonder the life of Bronson was turned into a Tom Hardy-led biopic. No wonder the life of Chopper was turned into a self-titled biopic helmed by director Andrew Dominik and starring Eric Bana as the caricature presentation of a tough, Australian criminal. Is there any difference between the tough-as-nails brutality found here and the more sophisticated mobsters of the Martin Scorsese-fuelled 1990s? Not too much. What separates them is the style of crime and the class in doing it.

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Star Trek Review

Even with those thick, glossy atmosphere choices, the work of J.J. Abrams on Star Trek is far better than first expected. Having no love for the series that spawned it all certainly helps when engaging with what is, essentially, a remastering of the characters and varied stories at the heart of this installation. A reference here or there will go over the heads of newly approached novices to the Star Trek universe, but as long as the bulk of it is understandable, the threats obvious and the chemistry between the ensemble successful, then Star Trek will have no trouble appealing to a new generation. A desire to engage with that is quite difficult, but easily optimised by smart writing that rattles through the quick and successful portions of the Gene Roddenberry show.

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Black Hawk Down Review

Casualties, Plato and American warfare all strike at the heart in Black Hawk Down, a Ridley Scott feature that was catapulted to acclaim by the post-9/11 feeling within America. That glean of patriotism within Black Hawk Down is not because of the tragedy that struck, but the acclaim that followed does tie itself to the feeling that swept America. That sense of love for the country is surely felt for those that need it to survive on a day-to-day basis when they see American heroes trapped in parts unknown. Fair play, Scott, it is an interesting angle to take and bolstered by the sudden strike of real-world relevancy and the horrible bloodbaths that open his feature.

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